Dr. Henry Paul, MD

Psychiatrist, Author and Educator

SIGNS YOUR TEEN IS TAKING CLUB DRUGS

June 12th, 2015

23564752_sThere are a lot of club drugs being used on the Rave dance scene. As a parent it is important to know what a Rave is (click here for more on that) and what drugs are available at Raves and the dangers of them. Rave clubs seem to be attracting adolescents and young adults in their mid-to-late 20’s to a place where there is plenty of dangerous substances and drugs. For a list of those drugs you can click here. Read on for the signs that your teenager may have taken club drugs and what you should do.

Signs that your teenager or loved one is using club drugs include:

  • Severe memory problems
  • Pronounced lack of coordination
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Chills and sweating
  • Slurred speech
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Bizarre speech or behavior
  • Fainting

What to do:

  • Most important is to let your teen know that you are informed about these drugs and let them know what the dangers are in detail.
  • Make sure you have a way to contact your teen when they go to a club, party or rave. Call them at regular intervals and set a curfew. Know where your child is going and with whom.
  • If your teen returns and appears to be under the influence of any drug, don’t scold but instead monitor the symptoms closely and if the symptoms appear to be severe seek medical help.
  • If drug use continues seek therapeutic and/or drug counseling. These drugs can be addictive.

Here is a link to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. There are also drug and substance abuse coalitions in many communities throughout the United States. Here are a couple that I found informative:

© Power To The Parent
Metropolitan Drug Commission

POPULAR RAVE DRUGS

June 10th, 2015

What substances are being used on the Rave dance scene? Rave clubs that seem to be attracting adolescents and young adults in their mid-to-late 20’s are known to be connected to a variety of substances and drugs. Here is a list of some of the most accessible and dangerous drugs often available at a rave.

4692114_sEcstasy is the most popular and well-known club drug. It is also referred to as “Molly”, E, X, “Adam” and “clarity”. It is a synthetic drug similar to amphetamines and mescaline (a hallucinogen). It both stimulates and causes psychedelic or hallucinogenic effects. It is most popular in a tablet or capsule form, and its effects typically last for three to six hours. It increases heart rate and blood pressure, and because it enables its user to dance all night, it often causes dehydration. Ecstasy can lead to heart and kidney disease, brain damage, and in rare cases can cause a marked muscle breakdown, high body temperature, heart attacks, strokes and seizures.

GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate) is also known as “G”, liquid ecstasy, and “Georgia Homeboy”. It is a very common drug at Raves that is often made with mail-order ingredients. It is ingested as a liquid, powder, tablet or capsule. GHB is both a sedative and a euphoriant. This is a drug that effects the central nervous system causing its user to feel relaxed and sedated. At high levels, it can slow breathing and heart rate to dangerously low levels. Overdose with this drug can occur quickly and be fatal. GHB is often used with alcohol, and this can be a deadly combination.

Rohypnol, in the same family as Valium and Xanax, is known as the “forget me pill”.  It is usually taken orally and is easily slipped into drinks. Rohypnol is a popular date rape drug because it causes memory loss from the moment it is taken. It lowers blood pressure, causes dizziness and confusion, as well as urine retention.

Methamphetamine is known as speed, meth crystal, glass, “Tina” and “Chalk”. It is very common at Rave parties. It acts as a stimulant and causes memory loss, uncontrollable aggression and violence, psychosis and nerve damage. It is an extremely disinhibiting drug and its users frequently engage in unsafe sex that often exposes them to sexually transmitted diseases, such as HIV and Hepatitis C.

Ketamine, also known as “special k”, “vitamin K” and “new ecstasy” is also known as angel dust. It is similar to the dangerous drug PCP. It is sometimes snorted or smoked with marijuana or cigarettes. Some people inject it, too. It causes serious neurological, blood pressure and breathing problems.

LSD, familiar for decades, is also known as acid. It wreaks havoc with your perceptions, thoughts, and feelings. It is taken as a pill, liquid or on a saturated blotted paper. LSD can cause severe psychotic reactions that can last long afterwards.

I’ll discuss what to do if you suspect that your child is taking these drugs in my next blog.

My Teen Wants to Go to a Rave.  What’s a Rave?

Disclaimer
This blog is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended as medical or psychiatric advice for individual conditions or treatment and does not substitute for a medical or psychiatric examination. A psychiatrist must make a determination about any treatment or prescription. Dr. Paul does not assume any responsibility or risk for the use of any information contained within this blog.

MY TEEN WANTS TO GO TO A RAVE! WHAT IS A RAVE?

June 5th, 2015

If you’ve got a teenager in the house than you need to know about “raves.” A rave party is typically an all-night, ear-splitting underground party that features electronic music. Ever heard of Daft Punk? Now Grammy Award winners, they got their start as a “rave” band.

23354899_sThese raves are held in places like warehouses, rental halls, barns, and open-air spaces where kids go crazy and, almost always, find drugs in abundance. The drugs available at raves may not be familiar to you, but they ought to be. Their effects are alarming and potentially life threatening.

The rave party phenomenon has been around for more than 20 years. It started in the UK and quickly spread to the US; particularly to the West Coast. It didn’t take long for it to spread across the country. The drugs offered at the raves primarily keep kids (yes, they are marketing to kids) energetic and dancing all night. Club drugs, as they are known, are dangerous, and parents need to know what they are and what the signs are that their kids may be taking them.

Most of the club drugs are made illegally, come from unknown sources, and are made with various mixes of unknown chemicals. On their own or mixed with alcohol and other drugs, they can be catastrophically toxic and sometimes fatal. Adding to their danger is that little is known about their toxicity making it difficult to treat overdoses.

Many of these drugs are colorless, odorless and tasteless posing a serious threat for young unsuspecting teens. Since some of these drugs cause amnesia, date rape and unrecalled sexual assault is one frequent outcome. Teens who take these drugs may often engage in risky sex that they don’t remember, and that exposes them to contracting sexually transmitted diseases including HIV and Hepatitis C.

Research has shown that club drugs have long-lasting effects on muscle tissue and the brain, especially memory functions. Combined with alcohol, as they often are at rave parties, their effects become potentially fatal. In 2013, there were four deaths linked to the club drug Molly. These deaths opened a nationwide dialogue about the use of illegal stimulants at concerts, raves and electronic dance music shows. It also shed some light on the music venues and the difficulties encountered by organizers to keep those substances out.

Last year, I wrote about the club drug Molly and its dangers. I will highlight some of the other drugs (cocaine, meth, LSD, etc.) that are popular with teens in my next blog. I’ll also discuss what to do if you suspect that your child is taking these drugs.

Learn more about Molly: 

Molly: Why the Club Drug is so Dangerous
Club Drug ‘Molly’ Eyed in Four Deaths
There’s Something about Molly

Disclaimer
This blog is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended as medical or psychiatric advice for individual conditions or treatment and does not substitute for a medical or psychiatric examination. A psychiatrist must make a determination about any treatment or prescription. Dr. Paul does not assume any responsibility or risk for the use of any information contained within this blog.

 

MOLLY

November 26th, 2013

MOLLY is the name of a new drug which has been flooding the party scene and especially been marketed to teenagers.  It is made mostly in China and is very easy to get over the internet.  It has become popular at electronic music parties just like ecstasy was for many years.  Actually, it was considered pure ecstasy at first, but now you usually have no idea what you are taking when you take MOLLY.  It is a combination of synthetic drugs-over 250 compounds has been found already.  The combinations vary, and there is no way of knowing what you are taking from batch to batch.  It is usually sold as a capsule or powder.

Like club drugs of the past it is taken with the idea of becoming euphoric.  It does accomplish that sometimes but also has side effects, which can be quite dangerous.  It stimulates the nervous system which can result in rapid heart rates, high blood pressure, seizures, sweating and sometimes panic to the degree of psychotic breakdowns.  Young people have been having breakdowns, becoming violent and out of control.  Deep depression often follows use of MOLLY.  This drug has also caused death.

We have always been aware of the dangerous effects of all sorts of drugs, but MOLLY use seems even more sinister because what is being ingested is unknown.  Thus, diagnosis and treatment is more difficult, and the danger is much greater.

STAY AWAY FROM MOLLY!!

 

DISCLAIMER
Information contained in this blog is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended as medical or psychiatric advice for individual conditions or treatment and does not substitute for a medical or psychiatric examination. A psychiatrist must make a determination about any treatment or prescription. Dr. Paul does not assume any responsibility or risk for the use of any information contained within this blog.